Is the sky beautiful? Julio Grinblatt wants to know

The current show at MINUS Space asks good questions, even if at first glance it looks like a tacit grouping of blocks of blue.

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The artist, Julio Grinblatt, who hails from Argentina and works in Bed-Stuy, used a simple set of instructions that read almost like a Yoko Ono poem to create this compelling show.
Basically, he took one photograph of a blue sky, and gave the negative to different printing labs, asking them simply to print him ‘a beautiful sky.’ The results are diverse. Some of the blues are warm and cerulean, some are pale and cool.
What’s really beautiful is the sense of failure here — in particular, of the medium of Photography.
Some of the prints have edges that are brownish and a bit dented and messed up. Others, looking for ‘perfection,’ are (boringly) unmodulated. And then there’s the fact that they’re just hard to see, one blue surface reflecting another slightly different blue surface from across the room.

They function like typologies of misinformation, or maybe, of the fungibility of meaning.

They’re ‘wrong,’ and that’s what so right about them.
Sigh.

Here is the script, the sole info for readers, accompanying the images. It’s framed on the wall, and, in typical MINUS Space style, is direct:

1. I took a photograph of a clear sky.
2. I sent the negative to a professional color lab.
3. I asked the printer to print a beautiful sky.
4. Repeat from 2.

I find work like this so affirming; it explains why it’s possible that people can get bad haircuts in this world; it confirms that no one in this society of mass consumption — no matter how self righteous — really knows what they’re talking about. It affirms my belief that forming your own sensibility and love of art is So Important.